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Acupuncture and Dry Needling

Acupuncture has been around for thousands of years. It is based on long standing traditions of inserting fine needles in points mapped out in the body along lines called meridians. Each meridian is characterized by being associated with certain functions of the body and each point is considered a focal area to draw on QI or lifeforce energy. There are many different styles and techniques in acupuncture.

Dry needling is more anatomically based. It is based on the health practitioner’s ability to assess an injury or health condition and understand the local and regional anatomy of the area affected. As such, health practitioners educated in western schools are much more likely to use dry needling techniques. The main premise is to reduce tone in a tissue. In this way pain is reduced and healing of the tissue is increased.

Dr. James has been trained in both acupuncture and dry needling techniques. He uses a combination of both depending on the patient and what is the goal of the therapy.

Regardless of the techniques, both acupuncture and dry needling will affect local and central nervous system (CNS) mechanisms of pain and soft tissue injury. Locally needling will affect trigger point formations and tension along and within the fascia. Centrally needling will affect how the brain and central nervous system respond to pain and stress. The more chronic condition, the more influence the central nervous system will have on the ability to heal.

In our office we most commonly use acupuncture/dry needling for:

While at an acupuncture course, Dr. DiGiuseppe had some acupuncture done on himself to test out some new techniques.

While at an acupuncture course, Dr. DiGiuseppe had some acupuncture done on himself to test out some new techniques.

  • Shoulder and rotator cuff injuries
  • Tennis elbow
  • Jaw problems (TMJ dysfunction)
  • Sinus congestion
  • Plantar fasciitis
  • Chronic pain syndromes
  • Sciatica
  • Ganglion cysts